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Orthopedic Surgery

Total Joint Arthroplasty




What is arthroplasty?

Arthoplasty is the reconstruction or replacement of a joint in order to restore range of motion and relieve pain. Treasure Valley Hospital physicians commonly perform this type of surgery on knees, hips, shoulders and ankles.




What is the recovery time for arthroplasty surgery?

Patients who undergo arthroplasty surgery at Treasure Valley Hospital typically go home the same day or day after their procedure. They are given pain medication, antibiotics, and begin their physical therapy while still in the hospital. Physical therapy will continue for several weeks, and it could take just as long to be able to resume light daily activities.




How do I prepare for this type of surgery?

  • Your doctor or pre-admission nurse may tell you to stop taking certain medications, vitamins and dietary supplements prior to your surgery.
  • Do not eat anything after midnight the day before surgery.
  • Shower or bathe the morning of your surgery according to directions given at your pre-admission appointment.
  • Do not shave the surgical area prior to arriving at the hospital for your procedure.
  • Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing and slip-on shoes. If you are having shoulder surgery, bring an extra-large old t-shirt that can be cut up the side, allowing your arm to pass through.
  • Do not wear makeup, perfume/aftershave, lotion, or deodorant.
  • Do not wear jewelry.
  • Leave all valuables at home.
  • If you wear contact lenses, bring an appropriate storage container for them and a pair of glasses to use pre- and post-surgery.
  • Bring these supplies if they apply to you:
    • Insulin
    • Rescue Inhaler
    • CPAP
    • Dental Device
  • Arrange ahead of time for a family member or friend to drive you home from the hospital after surgery.



This information is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor.

Carpal Tunnel


 

What is carpal tunnel surgery?

Surgery to relieve pressure on the median nerve in the wrist may be performed after several weeks of non-surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome. Surgery might be recommended sooner if nerve damage is present. Your surgeon will likely use one of two surgical methods: open carpal tunnel release or endoscopic carpal tunnel release. The endoscopic technique results in a smaller scar and shorter recovery time, but there may be a slightly higher chance of needing a follow-up surgery later. With either method, you will be able to go home the same day of your surgery.


 

What is the recovery time for a carpal tunnel release?

 

The bandage or splint will be removed from your wrist approximately 1 – 2 weeks after surgery. Total recovery time could be a few days up to a few months and will probably involve physical therapy. Your doctor will recommend specific work restrictions, and you will need to refrain from using your repaired hand during this time. Pain is controlled with over-the-counter medications.


 

How do I prepare for this type of surgery?

  • Your doctor or pre-admission nurse may tell you to stop taking certain medications, vitamins and dietary supplements prior to your surgery. It is important to follow their instructions.
  • Do not eat anything after midnight the day before surgery.
  • Shower or bathe the morning of your surgery according to directions given at your pre-admission appointment.
  • Do not shave the surgical area prior to arriving at the hospital for your procedure.
  • Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing and slip-on shoes.
  • Do not wear makeup, perfume/aftershave, lotion, or deodorant.
  • Do not wear jewelry.
  • Leave all valuables at home.
  • Bring a list of the medications you currently take.
  • If you wear contact lenses, bring an appropriate storage container for them and a pair of glasses to use pre- and post-surgery.
  • Bring these supplies if they apply to you: insulin, rescue inhaler, CPAP, or dental device.
  • Arrange ahead of time for a family member or friend to drive you home from the hospital after surgery.

 

 

This information is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor.

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